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Tracy, New Brunswick, Canada

Here are a few photos to describe what goes on at the cranberry bog:

Dry Harvest usually takes place from late September to mid October:

Dry harvest is dependent on the weather, the plants need to be dry for us to be able to harvest.  When the plants are dry we use walk-behind pickers to harvest the fruit. 

Picking machine dry harvesting cranberriesHarvest field with a bag of harvested cranberriesPicking machine with a close up of fruit

As the fruit is picked off the plants it is put into bags and taken to a blower to separate the leaves from the berries. 

Blowing machine with cranberries going into a 300lb boxBlowing machine with cranberries going into a 300lb boxLoading a bag of cranberries into the blowerLoading a bag of cranberries into the blower
Loading a bag of cranberries into the blowerLoading a bag of cranberries into the blower

The cranberries are then sorted by hand to ensure that only the best cranberries are given to the consumer. 

Bouncer for sorting berries (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Bouncer and conveyor for sorting berries (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Bouncer and conveyor for sorting berries (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Bouncer sorting berries
Kind volunteers on the sorting lineFinal product going to consumers

Dry harvest is done because it prolongs the shelf life of the fresh cranberries.  When cranberries come off the vine and get wet their outer shell begins to take in that water and it softens the cranberry.  The most efficient way to harvest cranberries is by using the wet method. These cranberries are harvested and immediately frozen for use in juice or dried cranberries.  

Wet Harvest usually takes place in late October or early November:

Wet harvest is when the cranberry bed is flooded with water.  This makes it easier for us to harvest the cranberries because they are able to float. 

Flooded bed with the cranberries ready for harvest (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Flooded cranberry bed (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)

We use a machine called a beater that works similar to a paddle wheel on a boat and this movement of the machine and water knocks the berries off the vines.  

Beating the berries (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'DICI)Beating the berries (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICIBeating the berries (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)

Then the cranberries are collected in a boom to gather and load them into a truck to take them to a cleaning facility.  

Berries in the boom (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Cranberries in a boom (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Shrinking the boom (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Shrinking the boom (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)
Booming the cranberries (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)

They are then pumped from the bed into a truck using a large fruit pump. 

Cranberries being pumped from the bed (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Cranberries being loaded into the truck (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Cranberries being loaded into the truck (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Cranberries being collected for the vacuum pump (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)
Cranberries being collected for the vacuum pump (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Cranberries being collected for the vacuum pump (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Cranberries being loaded into the truck (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)Cranberries being loaded into the truck (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)
Cranberries being loaded into the truck (Photo by Kelsey Wilson from CE D'ICI)